Projects

The Johnson’s Landing landslide is being restored using natural processes.  Pioneering species such as Balsam Poplar and Sitka Alder have been established on the slide.  Many other species, including conifers are now becoming established.

 

Slide Show

Keats Island shoreline restoration was conducted using the natural processes model based on beach rye and rotting logs.  Old rotting logs are used to provide the framework for the growth of native beach rye grass.

 

Slide Show

The former Battle Lake Gas Plant was remediated to remove contaminants and then restored using the rough and loose soil treatment to control erosion.  The successional approach was used to revegetated the area using Balsam Poplar, Willow and Red-osier Dogwood cuttings.

 

Two road fill failure landslides in the K16 area of the Nanaimo Lakes forest area.  One was treated using a large rock wall and the other was treated using soil bioengineering systems.  There is a large cost difference between these approaches.

 

Slide Show

The sand cliffs at the University of British Columbia threatened the Museum of Anthropology and other buildings on campus at the top of the slope.  Soil bioengineering systems were used over the winter of 1988/89 to stabilize a 2.5 ha portion of the cliffs.  This treatment has been followed over the years since stabilization and natural successional processes have established alder, maple, Douglas-fir and hemlock.
 
A small slump adjacent to Tupper Creek was treated with soil bioengineering systems as part of the CP Rail Roger’s Pass Project.  This was a very cost effective solution and has successfully stabilized the slope and started the successional processes that will maintain vegetation on the slope.
 

A small fill failure on the banks of the Cowichan River in the town of Lake Cowichan was treated with soil bioengineering methods.  A fence was used to keep hungry beavers away.  This site has grown well and provided a dense cover of riparian vegetation.

 

Slide Show

The Juniper Place landslide occurred on a 65 degree slope.  The slope is composed of Quadra sediment with some dense layers and some sandy layers.  Seepage water was prevalent on the slope.  Live pole drains were used to control the seepage water while wattle fences were used to treat the steep slope.  In addition, live staking was used to establish woody vegetation on the lower parts of the slide.

Slide Show

 

The Vantreight slope is a smaller steep slope composed of sandy Quadra sediment. The toe had been stabilized with large rock, but the slope was untreated.  Wattle fences were used to treat the slope.  A large quantity of English Ivy had to be removed prior to the treatment.  Ivy does not hold slopes together due to limited rooting.  The cuttings used in the wattle fences grew well and the slope is now stable.

Slide Show